Appetite for Self-Destruction by Steve Knopper – For the first time, Appetite for Self -Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of. Steve Knopper. · Rating details · ratings · reviews. For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and. Appetite for Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry in the Digital Age: : Steve Knopper: Books.

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For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world — and seld advent of file sharing brought it to its knees.

Sign up and apeptite a free eBook! The informal language becomes annoying especially as the books follows patterns of having long, informative chunks, then an even longer boring section, and then another entertaining passage, etc.

Appetite for Self-Destruction eBook by Steve Knopper | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

I’m saying the law and lawyers did its bit to kill the industry! A fantastic account of the many ways the record industry failed to accept the digital future of music. Steve Jobs, of course, laughed all the way to the bank over that one.

There were several in the industry who felt that the record companies should start selling files online, and several aborted attempts at creating an iTunes like service occurred throughout the industry, but nobody wanted to let go of the cash cow that was the CD.

It felt well-researched, but the longer I read on, the more I changed my opinion on this impression. To wit, a note about how, when initially launched, iTunes took 22 cents out of every 99 cent song purchase for itself, knoppwr 67 cents to be divided among the various rights holders. Here is the history of the music business in brief: You don’t need to be a music fiend or geek to find this a satisfying read.

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Appetite for Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry in the Digital Age

Anyways, great if you are trying to catch up on the record industries trials and tribulations nowadays. Appetite for Self-Destruction is a lesson of what happens when an industry is unwilling to change in response to new technology.

Now, the conventional music business model is all but DOA. May 29, Sean rated it really liked it Shelves: Laced with anecdote, buttressed by detailed accounts of the most flagrant record-industry transgressions, Appetite its title nicked from that of the Guns N’ Roses debut disc is an enthralling read, equal parts anger appetlte regret.

The singles I like are the extended versions a la the Well I’ve never been a fan of the majors even when my favorite acts ended up on them eventually.

That is where Appetite for Self-Destruction begins… Sekf for Self-Destruction is ddestruction into time frames depicting how each era in the recording industry led up to or was effected by the digital wave and eminent crash of the industry as we knew it. This book is part hard journalism; part celebrity gossip.

The part it hints at but doesn’t get into Why did my kids listen to my s music when they were teenagers?

Lists with This Book. In a comprehensive, fast-paced account full of larger-than-life personalities, Rolling Stone contributing editor Steve Knopper shows that, after the incredible wealth and excess of the ’80s and ’90s, Sony, Warner, and the other big players brought about their own downfall through years of denial and bad dwstruction in the face of dramatic advances in technology. For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of xelf recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the stege business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world—and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees.

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What’s so fascinating abo Appetite for Self-Destruction: There aren’t any real conclusions drawn about the digital-driven sea changes of the past destructiin years, other than the usual finger-pointing and scapegoating. Knopper is inordinately preoccupied with giving name dropping character studies of record executive excess, and largely devoid of insight into how the industry got left so far behind.

Appetite for Self-Destruction

Key takeaway from the book: Thanks to the Internet and the MP3 revolution, karmic justice has finally been served: Plus, I’m still pissed about growing up in the 70s and 80s, when you’d buy an album only to find that it was complete crap. I’m sure the cobbler industry, the family farm industry, print newspaper industry, etc.

Usually the market dictates price okay I’m not really bought on that onebut iTunes and the record industry decided 99 cents was the going price, not the purchasing public.

He points out that the industry’s biggest problem was not the theft of music, but their outright refusal to deal with it on any level beyond suing the pants off of people who posted files for sharing. What’s so fascinating about this tale is just how short-sighted and childish these industry executives could be. Syeve find this difficult to believe.

The takeover and consolidation of FM radio by large corporations is also not meaningfully explored.